Are online forums social media?

Discussion forums are one of the OG forms of social networks, which originate from bulletin boards and are used to talk about very specific topics. Facebook groups are extremely popular, with more than 1.8 billion people using them monthly.

Are online forums social media?

Discussion forums are one of the OG forms of social networks, which originate from bulletin boards and are used to talk about very specific topics. Facebook groups are extremely popular, with more than 1.8 billion people using them monthly. It's no surprise; they're well-designed and make it easy to follow up on conversations. Since they tend to focus exclusively on a certain topic, it means that you can get information or conversations about specific topics without even having to leave the Facebook application.

Brad is a staff writer for Gaming %26 Social Media. Interested in a variety of lifestyle-based topics, Brad often writes articles about the relationship between technology and people. Brad has a first-class degree in digital marketing. A forum isn't your Facebook page, Twitter profile, or blog, according to O'Keefe.

In those services, people have to choose you one way or another, he says. In a forum, everyone can see what others have posted. This requires a different level of understanding and a different approach. You'll probably find yourself browsing Twitter, Facebook or some other social network for a while before realizing that you've lost track of time.

Others can be found on corporate or media sites, such as Dell's support forums or Southern Living magazine's community message forums. Forums usually have a subsection where you can talk about things from everyday life, movies, TV shows, games, anything that is not related to the main topic for which it was created. Despite the popularity of forums, users want a reward system to be established for content creators or for those who provide forum experience. An overwhelming 90% of respondents said they would be more likely to contribute to an online forum if they were compensated for their contributions.

Not only do users seek to obtain reliable information in specialized forums, but the survey revealed that more than half (53%) prefer to interact with other users in independent forums rather than with centralized sites such as Facebook and Twitter. With the increase in misinformation on online social networking sites, people's use and perception of major social media sites as reliable sources of information and places to exchange ideas with others has declined. While you can access most forums via the mobile browser, it will be clumsy and less responsive than an application, and almost definitely less easy to navigate. Even if social media platforms are sometimes slow to implement the changes their user base wants, you're probably less likely to wait for changes to occur in a forum that no longer has many features offered by social media.

The Internet is a fast-moving place and, although social networks tend to adapt and change with the times, forums remain fairly static. The fast nature, the types of mixed media (text, image and video) and the design principle of scrolling through a timeline encourage you to catch up are examples of social networks that try to keep you on the platform for longer. Forums and message boards (old school social networks) are still one of the most popular, if not the most popular, places to ask questions and answer questions about brands and products. In fact, 62% of those surveyed believe that content creators should be able to carry their reputation from one forum to another.

The main reason to be in a forum is to participate in other people's discussions, not to initiate them. My company's research on social media and the banking industry revealed that a staggering number (90 percent) of all online conversations about banks and their products took place in forums and message boards. .

Allen Craiger
Allen Craiger

Incurable food advocate. Devoted web guru. Freelance analyst. Avid twitter expert. Hardcore internet ninja. Typical webaholic.